Where you been?

 

On the left is a display I made in November for a library event at Altona for Fiona McIntosh’s afternoon tea visit to promote her brand new title, The Tea Gardens.

It was a great afternoon and this is the second event we have hosted for Fiona McIntosh.  https://www.penguin.com.au/books/the-tea-gardens-9780143789833

On the right is a whimsical tattoo done by an amazing artist and mate, @tashiko – http://www.tashikotattoo.com/

I’m in need of some new work but as per usual, it gets bumped down the list of importance. Such is life.

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Yassss!

2017’s best books, for me, are based on the titles I read this year. Release dates, unlike reading dates, may vary (though I think most of these are actually new). I always feel it’s cheating a bit, to discuss the year’s reads in December, since the year isn’t over. December books get short shrift. But…

via 2017’s Best Books: My Year in Reading — Nephele Tempest

Legacies of British Slave Ownership: Thoughts on British Imperial History and Public Memory

JHIBlog

by Emily Rutherford

Last week, I was meant to be teaching the women’s suffrage movement to my modern British history discussion section, but my students only wanted to talk about one thing: Prime Minister David Cameron visited Jamaica last week, but was dismissive of calls from prominent Jamaican politicians and public figures that Britain pay reparations to Jamaica and other West Indian nations whose people were the victims of Britain’s eighteenth- and nineteenth-century slave trade. My students were interested in this, I suspect, because they are of a generation of American and international students who care deeply about imperial and postcolonial history, and see a greater understanding of empire (and its sins) as a key reason to study British history. If you count the US (as we should) as a former British colony, nearly everyone enrolled in the lecture course for which I TA has a heritage that is somehow…

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‘Apostrophes’: Nikole Hannah-Jones on Race, Education and Inequality, at Longreads Story Night

Longreads

The video above is an incredibly moving piece by The New York Times Magazine’s Nikole Hannah-Jones, filmed at our Longreads Story Night in New York City. Our thanks to Hannah-Jones, Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, and all of our special guests for an amazing night. We’ll share more clips from Story Night soon, and you can see all of our videos on our YouTube page or Facebook.

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“Indigenizing the Academy” without Indigenous people: who can teach our stories?

Moontime Warrior

“The Indigenous person engages in philosophy by thoughtfully examining the world. The outsider examines Indigenous philosophy by thoughtfully interacting with the Indigenous philosopher.”

— Thurman Lee Hester Jr. and Dennis McPherson, “The Euro-American Philosophical Tradition and its Ability to Examine Indigenous Philosophy”1

With the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Report on residential schools in June 2015, “Indigenizing the Academy” is a hot topic in Canadian universities. As institutions explore the introduction of Indigenous content, we have to question what is defined as Indigenous content, who this content serves, and how the pursuit of “indigenizing the academy” can easily become exploitative.

In 2013, I helped put together a new syllabus for an Indigenous Philosophy class at my university. The philosophy department wouldn’t consider allowing someone without a PhD in philosophy teach this course, but pairing an Indigenous undergrad with a white philosophy professor was, apparently, acceptable. (Oh, the power…

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